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Saturday, August 29, 2009

going green wasing machine


I GOT A REFUND FROM THE WASHING MACHINE MANUFACTURER THANKS GUYS .

I will use the money to buy a water tank and will use the waste water in the garden and this will save the water better than an water saving washing machine!
water saving


As seen in the photo there is not enough water to wash clothes in...
I bought a water saving washing machine. I would have been better buying a water tank and pump and saved the water that way, As the new washing machine doesn't wash clothes. A normal washing machine and a water tank would save more water over time and the clothes would have been cleaner. The waste water can then be used to water the garden.

This is an extract from an email I got from choice online web feed back

Our testers also ran the Aquasmart on a 'traditional' wash * which uses twice the amount of water of the high-efficiency wash * and no residue was left behind. However, this defeats the purpose of buying a water-saving model in the first place.

We received some feedback about the Fisher & Paykel Aquasmart models leaving detergent residue on clothes. Our rinse test only measures the soluble component of detergent left in the clothes, so we did not see this. Overall they are very good performers and so remain in our What to buy list, however if this problem occurs, our research detailed in Downsides of water efficiency offers some advice.

From our report:
Downsides of water efficiency
Detergent residue
Following reports by concerned readers that their water-efficient washing machines (including the CHOICE recommended model, the Fisher & Paykel Aquasmart) left detergent residue on their clothes, we decided to recreate the problem in our labs and try to work out how to deal with it.

The problem comes about because some of the insoluble ingredients in detergents and some dirt don't get washed out when used with a low-water program. Normal CHOICE tests didn't pick this up because the standard rinse performance test measures the soluble component of detergent that's left in the water after rinsing, not the insolubles. Also, our wash load is made up of white items (to best check the wash performance), which don't show up detergent residue well.

Our testers used various detergents for the test, washing black items in two water-efficient machines (the Fisher & Paykel Aquasmart WLT70T60C and the Miele W1712), to see which produced the least residue:

A powder detergent that was a poor performer in our last test.
A high-performing powder, both new and in a humidified state (simulating a packet having been open for a while).
High-performing clear top- and front-loading liquid detergents.
Only the high-performing liquid detergent didn't leave any residue on our test load. Alternatively, using half the recommended dose of the high-performance laundry powder, dissolved in warm water, also reduced the problem. CHOICE tests have shown that liquid detergent doesn't wash quite as well as powders, and it's possible a reduced dose of powder will lower the dirt removal performance. But if your wash load (like most people's) isn't very dirty to start with, these two options are probably your best bets for getting rid of detergent residue with the least compromise on wash performance.

Our testers also ran the Aquasmart on a 'traditional' wash * which uses twice the amount of water of the high-efficiency wash * and no residue was left behind. However, this defeats the purpose of buying a water-saving model in the first place.

Fisher & Paykel agreed that using a good-quality liquid detergent will reduce residue. It told us the problem tends to happen with very water-efficient machines, if you're using poor-quality or old detergent, and living in an area with very hard water can exacebate the problem. It also suggested not buying detergent in bulk, because once opened it absorbs moisture, which lowers performance and can cause residue problems. As a last resort, Fisher & Paykel suggests switching to warm water washing, or a 'traditional' wash.

Other things that help:

Store detergent in an airtight container to prevent it becoming clumpy, which can make the problem worse.
Try putting the residue-affected clothes in a dryer on the 'air-dry' setting (that is, without heat, just using the fan) for five minutes. Some people have found it helps 'knock off' the residue.


cheers Stewart


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